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Open access and public domain images for teachers: Visual literacy

Guide to images in the public domain or shared free of copyright restrictions (at least for non profit, educational uses.)

Get Visual

           

Visual literacy is a set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use, and create images and visual media.

The images above were downloaded from Flickr's Creative Commons 

Evaluate Images

Questions to ask when evaluating a digital image.

1. Content: Take a few minutes to look at the image. Who or what do you see represented in the image?  What do the physical properties such as color, form, and placement contribute to the image? Consider how formal elements impact the meaning of the image. 

2.. Image quality: How is the image resolution? Is it clear or grainy? How big is the image? Can you tell if the image has been cropped, scanned at a low resolution or otherwise manipulated?

3. Evaluate & Investigate:  What information is provided in the metadata (for example title,creator, date, medium, size, are typical data used to describe images)?   Where is the image from? (not only the creator, but the organization that has shared it). Can you find other sources (print and online) that further describe and contextualize the image?

Assess reliability and accuracy of image sources based on evaluations of  the authoritative sources you’ve consulted, your own point of view or bias.

What judgments can you make about image sources based on your evaluations of image and information quality?

This content is drawn from a guide to Visual Literacy from  University of California at Irvine. Visual Literacy: Evaluate Images [website] with permission.

Scan, Edit, Store

Yes, Lane Library has a book scanner that will scan larger format images in color and at high resolution. So, images found in books maybe used in your class presentations easily.

Photocopiers in the Learning Commons and the Library also create scans that can be e-mailed, or bring a usb drive. 


Some editing options:

1. Paint, name of a basic picture editing software available in campus computer labs. Use it to crop, resize images.

2. Adobe Photoshop software with  more editing options is available from the MAC lab in the Learning Commons.  

3. Free web based tools, some recommended sites:

 


A few of the popular web-based, image storing/sharing options. Don't forget to add some metadata to your images.

Cite in MLA Style

Examples of MLA Citations to images from the Web.  Hint: Metadata provided by museum websites is very useful when citing these images.

Polygnotos.Terracotta Pelike (jar). 450–440 B.C. Terra cotta; red-figure. Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York. Greek and Roman Art. Museum. Web. 19 Aug 2015. Tiepolo, Giovanni Battista. Perseus and Andromeda. 1740. Painting. Frick Collection. New York. Catalog of Art Museum Images Online. Web. 19 Aug 2015.
Lastname, Firstname. [of creator, if absolutely unknown, skip this element and put title of work first] Title of Work. Year. Medium. Institution housing work: Location of Institution. Website name. Website sponsor. Web. Date of retrieval. Lastname, Firstname. [of creator, if absolutely unknown, skip this element and put title of work first] Title of Work. Year. Medium. Institution housing work: Location of Institution. Website name. Website sponsor. Web. Date of retrieval.